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Statement – Food Foundation calls for Urgent Government Review of School Food

 

 

Food Foundation calls for Urgent Government Review of School Food

13th January 2021

In light of recent developments on current food provision for Free School Meal pupils during Covid-19 school closure, we are calling on the Government to conduct an urgent comprehensive review into Free School Meal policy across the UK to feed into the next Spending Review. The review should be debated in Parliament and published before the summer holidays.

It needs to:

  1. Review the current eligibility thresholds for Free School Meals across all four nations to eliminate disparities and to explore whether disadvantaged children are being excluded in line with National Food Strategy recommendation. The ongoing eligibility for children with No Recourse to Public Funds should be considered explicitly.
  2. Urgently consider how funding for Free School Meals can deliver the biggest nutritional and educational impact, supporting children’s learning and well-being throughout the school day and during the school holidays (including breakfast provision and the School Fruit and Vegetable Scheme). This should include whether the current allowance for Free School Meals is adequate and whether funding for national breakfasts adequately covers all who would benefit from access to provision.
  3. Explore how schools can be supported to deliver the best quality school meals which adhere to school food standards and which ensure the poorest children receive the best possible offer, including by introducing mandatory monitoring and evaluation on an ongoing basis of Free School Meal take-up, the quality/nutritional adequacy of meals, and how the financial transparency of the current system can be improved.
  4. Consider what we have learned from Covid-19 and its impact on children in low-income families and the implications of this for school food policy for the next 5 years, as the country recovers.
  5. Consider how existing school food programmes (such as Free School Meals, holiday and breakfast provision) can eliminate experiences of stigma for the poorest students. Review the impact that Universal Infant Free School Meals has had on stigma, health and education.
  6. Consider the role of family income (wages and benefits) in enabling families to afford quality food in and outside of school time and during the holidays with choice and dignity.

The process should involve input from all the devolved nations and done in consultation with children and young people, as well as teachers, charities, NGOs, frontline catering staff and school meals service providers. It should draw on evidence of food insecurity and health inequalities.

 

#EndChildFoodPoverty
www.endchildfoodpoverty.org

 

Media enquiries to:

Jo Ralling: jo.ralling@FoodFoundation.org.uk, 07770 500858

Raf Brogan: Raf.Bogan@FoodFoundation.org.uk, 07891 286340